{Stus-List} pursuit starts

rspence7 rspence7 at cox.net
Fri Nov 2 08:45:14 EDT 2007


Gary, 
After I blew out both rotator cuffs, I found that I couldn't pull any strings.
 So, Frith is now Athena out of Hampton Va.

Roger
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Gary Russell 
  To: cnc-list at cnc-list.com 
  Sent: Friday, November 02, 2007 7:34 AM
  Subject: Re: {Stus-List} pursuit starts


  Wow! With an intro like that, Roger, how could I refuse.

  First pursuit races:
       I'm a big fan of pursuit races, especially for novice racers.  Because of the staggered start, there is less of an intimidation factor at the start.  There is the instant gratification factor, in that whenever you pass a boat, you know you have beaten her.  Finally, there is the exhilaration at the finish as all the boats approach the finish line at approximately the same time.  Good fun!  The problem is with pursuit races, is that in situations where the wind is building, such as morning starts (for example), the faster boats (lower PHRF) have an advantage.  In dying winds (such as evening starts, the slower boats have an advantage.  This is just the opposite of typical PHRF (time on distance) races. 
   
  Now for Twenty Hundred Club (Narragansett Bay)
       Twenty Hundred Club runs a race on Narragansett Bay (RI) called the "Prince Henry the Navigator Race".  It was written up in Sailing Magazine a few years ago as the most unusual sailing race in the world.  Roger's description is right on.  The only real addition is that the distance sailed is corrected by PHRF so that any boat can compete.  Also, you can pick your own course around 23 selected buoys in the bay.  For a complete description go to our web site at: 

  http://www.twentyhundredclub.org

       Once there, go to the Race Page and check out the sailing instructions for the Prince Henry Race.  We are always looking for new racers and our dues are a whopping $40 per year.  Registration for all 5 races is another $40 total (including free booze).  How can you lose? 

  Gary
  S/V Expresso
  '75 C&C 35 Mk II
  East Greenwich, RI, USA

  PS   Hey Roger!  I haven't seen Frith out there is a while!  Why not join us?


   
  On 11/1/07, rspence7 <rspence7 at cox.net> wrote: 
    Narragansett Bay has a couple of very well attended staggered start races, about 20 miles in length.  As the bay is oriented north/south with prevailing SW winds, it typically allows for a close beat of about 5 miles, a close reach of 6 miles or so, dead down for 2 miles, then a broad reach, tightening to a beam reach for the course home.  All is done under PHRF.  Typically 80 to 100 boats participate, and many congregate at Barrington YC, or others, for a post race rum recap. 

    Typically, start times are noon-ish, or a bit before, to sail into a building wind, and the finish is around 4:30 or so.  Playing current is key, and many a race has been lost on current, or hugging the shore to get out of current, as your rig goes BOOM on a submerged close a-shore rock.   Also, a northerly will alter the strategy significantly, as one side of the bay is wider than the other, and a foul current while beating will be devastating. 

    Well attended, more so than the NBYA weekend regatta races.

    But, nothing gets a racer's adrenalin racing more than the guys who want to barge you with an already banged up boat, wearing a pirate's cap.  There's nothing like hitting the line with a bunch of boats, versus going off with three or four boats at your rating.  

    Also the adrenalin changes, as smaller boats are not doing all they can do to close on faster or bigger boats, looking at their sail set, headers/lifts angle of sail;  now the dynamic changes to always looking over your shoulder on potentially closing boats, as they look at your sails/course, and blanket potential.   Takes some tactical adjustment! 

    In all, I'd give it a go for a few beercan races to judge the reaction before a changeover.

    Now, I'll turn it over to Gary, Expresso, to discuss the  2000 Club Prince Henry the Navigator's Race, where-in racers start from differing points in the bay, based on their best assessment of tide current and potential wind, to sail the daily greatest distance between multiple given bouys throughout the Bay, without duplicating any leg of the course, and not finishing after a set finish time.   Very difficult with all the variables! 

    Gary, please come foreward to the microphone! 

    Roger
      ----- Original Message ----- 
      From: Pete Shelquist 
      To: cnc-list at cnc-list.com 
      Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 8:15 PM
      Subject: {Stus-List} pursuit starts

       
      Local club is thinking of using pursuit starts for medium distance races.  Say 20-40nm.  I like the idea that boats finish closer together, slow boats aren't the only ones stuck in slack evening air,  and new racers or short handers don't have a mass of boats to deal with on the line. 

      What do others do and why?







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