{Stus-List} #1 Diesel fuel

dwight veinot dwightveinot at hfx.eastlink.ca
Tue Oct 2 07:27:21 EDT 2007


John
Do you have any knowledge about adding a bit of gasoline to the diesel fuel,
say about 1% by volume?  I have been told that it is good for the engine in
terms of cleaning injectors and also provides for better ignition and
burning of the fuel?  I used to work in a lab where we did fuel and
lubricant analysis for our Canadian warships and one of our respected fuels
chemists said he thought it didn't cause any problems and could even be
beneficial, especially in colder climates.

Dwight Veinot
1974 C&C 35, Alianna
Head of St. Margaaret's Bay, NS
 
-----Original Message-----
From: cnc-list-bounces at cnc-list.com [mailto:cnc-list-bounces at cnc-list.com]
On Behalf Of John Cassara
Sent: October 2, 2007 8:15 AM
To: cnc-list at cnc-list.com
Subject: Re: {Stus-List} #1 Diesel fuel



http://www.answers.com/topic/fuel-oil?cat=technology



The relevant information is below:





Fuel oil in the United States is classified into six classes, according to 
its boiling temperature, composition and purpose. The boiling point, ranging

from 175 to 600 °C, and carbon chain length, 20 to 70 atoms, of the fuel 
increases with number. Viscosity also increases with fuel oil number and the

heaviest oil has to be heated to get it to flow. Price usually decreases as 
the fuel number increases. No. 1 fuel oil, No. 2 fuel oil and No. 3 fuel oil

are referred to as distillate fuel oils, diesel fuel oils, light fuel oils, 
gasoil or just distillate. For example, No. 2 fuel oil, No. 2 distillate and

No. 2 diesel fuel oil are almost the same thing. Diesel is different in that

it also has a cetane number limit which describes the ignition quality of 
the fuel. Distillate fuel oils are distilled from crude oil. Gas oil refers 
to the process of distillation. The oil is heated, becomes a gas and then 
condenses. It differentiates distillates from residual oil (RFO).

                                    No. 1 is similar to kerosene and is the 
fraction that boils off right after gasoline. No. 2 is the diesel that 
trucks and some cars run on, leading to the name "road diesel". It is the 
same thing as heating oil.

                                                                No. 3 is a 
distillate fuel oil and is rarely used. No. 4 fuel oil is usually a blend of

distillate and residual fuel oils, such as No. 2 and 6, however, sometimes 
it is just a heavy distillate. No. 4 may be classified as diesel, distillate

or residual fuel oil. No. 5 fuel oil and No. 6 fuel oil are called residual 
fuel oils (RFO) or heavy fuel oils. As far more No. 6 than No. 5 is 
produced, the terms heavy fuel oil and residual fuel oil are sometimes used 
as synonyms for No. 6. They are what remains of the crude oil after gasoline

and the distillate fuel oils are extracted through distillation. No. 5 fuel 
oil is a mixture of No. 6 (about 75-80%) with No. 2. No. 6 may also contain 
a small amount of No. 2 to get it to meet specifications. Residual fuel oils

are sometimes called light when they have been mixed with distillate fuel 
oil, while distillate fuel oils are called heavy when they have been mixed 
with residual fuel oil. Heavy gas oil, for example, is a distillate that 
contains residual fuel oil. The ready availability of very heavy grades of 
fuel oil is often due to the success of catalytic cracking of fuel to 
release more valuable fractions and leave heavy residue.










----- Original Message ----- 
From: "John Cassara" <jcassara at optonline.net>
To: <cnc-list at cnc-list.com>
Sent: Tuesday, October 02, 2007 7:03 AM
Subject: Re: {Stus-List} #1 Diesel fuel


Home heating oil is #2
Automotive diesel is #2 with additives
Kerosene is #1
You are correct kerosene is a lighter fraction than diesel.


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Steve Thomas" <sthoma20 at sympatico.ca>
To: <cnc-list at cnc-list.com>
Sent: Tuesday, October 02, 2007 4:10 AM
Subject: Re: {Stus-List} #1 Diesel fuel


#1 home heating oil should not be confused with kerosene.
They are not the same product.
Kerosene is a lighter fraction.

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "John Cassara" <jcassara at optonline.net>
To: <cnc-list at cnc-list.com>
Sent: Monday, October 01, 2007 7:17 AM
Subject: Re: {Stus-List} #1 Diesel fuel


Home heating oil is not different than automotive diesel fuel other than the
tax on auto diesel and the dye that is added to identify it. Kerosene is
often added to the diesel on big rigs to prevent jelling. The small outboard
tanks are more sensitive than the very large tanks used at home. There are
additive that can be purchased in the auto-store that will winterize the
fuel, safer and better than using kerosene!

#1 kerosene
#2 diesel with and without the tax dye
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel



----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Brödersen Jacob K Ctr ACC/A8II" <jacob.brodersen.ctr at langley.af.mil>
To: <cnc-list at cnc-list.com>
Sent: Monday, October 01, 2007 6:41 AM
Subject: Re: {Stus-List} #1 Diesel fuel


> Mitch,
>
> It's common up north to mix some #1 diesel with the #2 diesel to produce
> "winterized" fuel.  It will flow at a lower temperature and helps keep the
> big rigs rolling in the great white north.  #1 diesel is a common heating
> oil and should do well in your heater.  It will burn cleaner, as well as
> giving out more heat.  Try a batch of straight #1, I think you'll like it.
>
> Jake
>
> Jake Brodersen
> C&C 35 Mk-III
> "Midnight Mistress"
> Hampton VA
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> CnC-List mailing list
> CnC-List at cnc-list.com
> http://cnc-list.com/mailman/listinfo/cnc-list_cnc-list.com



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