{Stus-List} mast climbing

cscheaffer at comcast.net cscheaffer at comcast.net
Wed Dec 2 16:16:16 EST 2009



I've seen mast steps more commonly on hardcore cruisers or singlehanders.  Some fold flat, some are riveted or screwed.  The negative side is they add windage, weight aloft, the holes weaken the mast, and the screws induce corrosion. 



Another option is a series of loops made with 2" webbing that has mast slides sewn on, so you hoist it to the mast head and climb up.  Nice winter project. 



Chuck 




----- Original Message ----- 
From: "dwight veinot" <dwightveinot at hfx.eastlink.ca> 
To: cnc-list at cnc-list.com 
Sent: Wednesday, December 2, 2009 3:28:49 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern 
Subject: Re: {Stus-List} mast climbing 




I talked with a guy who had steps welded onto the sides of the mast on his boat.  He said they worked great and didn’t interfere with sailing otherwise. 




Dwight Veinot 

1974 C&C 35, Alianna 

Head of St. Margaret's Bay, NS 






From: cnc-list-bounces at cnc-list.com [mailto:cnc-list-bounces at cnc-list.com] On Behalf Of cscheaffer at comcast.net 
Sent: December 2, 2009 9:37 AM 
To: cnc-list at cnc-list.com 
Subject: {Stus-List} mast climbing 




Appreciate your stories.  



I tried to haul myself up our mast using a 4 to 1 tackle and mountain climbing gear.  Later tried a 3 to 1.   After 30 minutes I got very near the top but was exhausted, so abandoned the plan.  We since use a two halyard method.  One person winches you up and the 2nd person maintains a second halyard on you as a safety.  Working separate winches, the two people can haul you up together and share the load going up.  I wear a climbing harness that keeps me fairly comfortable for up to about an hour.  It is difficult to find people who are skilled and can be trusted to stick around and stay still while you work aloft and be ready for the ride down.  Last time I was lucky to find two willing souls but I had to show one guy how to operate my clutches and how to feed a self tailing winch and how to keep tension on the tail and hold a hand on the wraps around the winch drum to ease me down.  The other guy was more experienced and we proceeded very carefully and without a problem.  Having two guys in the cockpit seems to work well as they can help each other and then keep each other company during the wait. 



Anyone climbing the mast, 

Don't forget your camera.  The pictures can be spectacular from up there.  



Chuck 








----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Rich Knowles" <rk at ns.sympatico.ca> 
To: cnc-list at cnc-list.com 
Sent: Wednesday, December 2, 2009 1:07:58 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern 
Subject: {Stus-List} was WI-FI camera boat monitor now mast climbing 

Chuck, I agree. I'd stay off the mast while the boat is on stands, purely for safety reasons. Generally, I don't climb the mast. If I do, I take the tail of the main halyard forward and use the anchor windlass as a hoist.  





We have a mast crane at the club that we use for stepping masts and inspecting rigging. It's equipped with a bosun's chair and a separate fall arrester and harness which makes the mast and rigging job pretty comfortable, safer and easier than swinging on a halyard. The biggest difficulty is retaining the attention of the crane operator. A couple of years ago, I went up in the bosun's chair to work on the masthead gear and a few minutes later, when I looked down to signal my buddy at the controls to let me down, he was nowhere to be seen.  He had gone off to have a look at something or other and forgotten all about me. Others tell me it wasn't by accident...  





Another time I went up to work on the masthead of a large vessel and had to go right to the top of the crane. At that time the hoist consisted of a 4 part tackle, 11/8" double braid line and a uni-directional electric capstan drum. The braid had a habit of twisting as it was tensioned and, when I was ready to come down, I found that my 200 lbs wasn't enough to overcome the friction of the twisted tackle. I was up there a while until I was able to fish one side of a spinnaker halyard off the boat, tie it to the hook and get the ground crew to start me down. We have a single steel cable now on a reversing variable speed electric/hydraulic drum winch  which works a lot better. 






My mast sitting record occurred when I went up the mast on a friend's boat at a mooring in Baddeck to check his non-functioning VHF antenna. He slowly winched me up in his somewhat uncomfortable bosun's chair and I removed the  visibly broken antenna which I lowered to him on a line. He rowed ashore to get a new one from the chandlery while I swung in the hot sun. He got back a couple of hours later after, unknown to me, going into Sidney for a new one as the local store was out of stock. We laughed over that one for a few years. At least, he did. My nether portions are still sore. 





Rich Knowles 








INDIGO LF38 


Halifax , NS . 














On 2009-12-02, at 12:33 AM, cscheaffer at comcast.net wrote: 








 I agree that it can be easier on the boat to stay afloat, because the boat is better supported 100% in water than 10% on hard stands and wind gusts are absorbed better afloat by the boat heeling.  Knowing about boats being wintered in the water in NS is making me rethink our strategy here in South Jersey.  




It's probably better to climb the mast in the water?  Not on stands.  Your opinion? 




Chuck 





----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Rich Knowles" < rk at ns.sympatico.ca > 
To:   cnc-list at cnc-list.com 
Sent: Tuesday, December 1, 2009 9:30:55 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern 
Subject: Re: {Stus-List} WI-FI camera boat monitor 

The water freezes occasionally but not too much at our club which is near the open ocean. We have bubblers for the dozen or so boats that stay in. I have kept her in for the last few years with no ill effects. I haul out in the spring, usually early June, for a day or so, do the bottom and topsides, change the zincs and chuck her back in. I also go up the mast and check the rigging. It's a lot easier on the boat, and me, than removing the mast, or not, hauling and storing on land. 





Rich. 









On 2009-12-01, at 10:05 PM,   cscheaffer at comcast.net   wrote: 








Wow, You can keep a boat in the water through the winter in Halifax?  Doesn't the water freeze?  Do you use Bubblers? 




Chuck 





----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Rich Knowles" < rk at ns.sympatico.ca > 
To:   cnc-list at cnc-list.com 
Sent: Tuesday, December 1, 2009 9:00:55 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern 
Subject: {Stus-List} WI-FI camera boat monitor 

I'm thinking I'm going to install a wireless net cam on the boat this winter as a monitor I can see from anywhere anytime. The boat is stored in the water, has power on and is warm enough inside to permit a camera to operate. It's warmed by a couple of reflector floods that also light the interior. The club has wireless internet that covers my dock. If I get no response, it will be an indication that the power is off or the boat has sunk, covering the camera. 





Rich Knowles 







INDIGO LF38 


Halifax , NS . 












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