{Stus-List} mast climbing

Bob Moriarty bobmor99 at gmail.com
Thu Dec 3 18:03:01 EST 2009


Hmm. Well I'm gonna use water. Sounds safer.
Let's see, 10 pounds / gallon (Imp)  X (let's say) 200 pounds = 20 gallons.
I think I can hoist that much  to the top. Call me Otis.
"Otis elevators never let you down."

On Thu, Dec 3, 2009 at 5:50 PM, Brent Driedger <brentmd at highspeedcrow.ca>wrote:

> I believe Myth Busters looked into this and tried to re-create it. It was
> very funny!
>
> Cheers
>
> Brent
> s/v Wild Rover
>
> On 3-Dec-09, at 10:42 AM, Ronald B. Frerker wrote:
>
>  OK, OK, I'll 'fess up.  My corruption of the story was based on the song
>> "Why Paddy Won't be at Work Today."
>> Seemed like a good fit.
>> Ron
>> Wild Cheri
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>  The earliest version I'm aware of
>>> of this tale of woe dates for 1895 (yes, that is
>>> 1895!):
>>>
>>> http://www.snopes.com/humor/letters/bricks.asp
>>>
>>> The version posted below is one of the best versions
>>> around I think...
>>>
>>>
>>> On Wed, Dec 2, 2009 at 8:12 PM,
>>> Jim Watts <jimwatts at shaw.ca>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Here's a version closer to the original that I
>>> heard, although nationalities change constantly in the
>>> retelling.
>>>
>>> This is a bricklayer's accident report,
>>> which was printed in the
>>> newsletter of the Australian equivalent of the Workers'
>>> Compensation
>>> board. This is a true story. Had this guy died, he'd
>>> have received a
>>>
>>> Darwin Award for sure.......
>>>
>>> Dear Sir,
>>>
>>> I am writing in response to your request for
>>> additional information in
>>> Block 3 of the accident report form. I put "poor
>>> planning" as the
>>> cause of my accident. You asked for a fuller explanation
>>> and I trust
>>>
>>> the following details will be sufficient.
>>>
>>> I am a bricklayer by trade. On the day of the
>>> accident, I was working
>>> alone on the roof of a new six-story building. When I
>>> completed my
>>> work, I found that I had some bricks left over which, when
>>> weighed
>>>
>>> later were found to be slightly in excess of 500lbs. Rather
>>> than carry
>>> the bricks down by hand I decided to lower them in a barrel
>>> by using a pulley,
>>> which was attached to the side of the building
>>> on the sixth floor.
>>> Securing the rope at ground level, I went up to the roof,
>>> swung the
>>> barrel out and loaded the bricks into it. Then I went down
>>> and untied
>>>
>>> the rope, holding it tightly to ensure a slow descent of
>>> the bricks.
>>> You will note in Block 11 of the accident report form that
>>> I weigh
>>> 135lbs. Due to my surprise at being jerked off the ground
>>> so suddenly,
>>> I lost my presence of mind and forgot to let go of the
>>> rope. Needless
>>>
>>> to say, I proceeded at a rapid rate up the side of the
>>> building. In
>>> the vicinity of the third floor, I met the barrel, which
>>> was now
>>> proceeding downward at an equally impressive speed. This
>>> explained the
>>> fractured skull, minor abrasions and the broken collar
>>> bone, as listed
>>>
>>> in section 3 of the accident report form. Slowed only
>>> slightly, I
>>> continued my rapid ascent, not stopping until the fingers
>>> of my right
>>> hand were two knuckles deep into the pulley.
>>> Fortunately by this time I had regained my presence of mind
>>> and was
>>>
>>> able to hold tightly to the rope, in spite of beginning to
>>> experience
>>> pain. At approximately the same time, however, the barrel
>>> of bricks
>>> hit the ground and the bottom fell out of the barrel.
>>> Now devoid of the weight of the bricks, that barrel
>>> weighed
>>>
>>> approximately 50 lbs. I refer you again to my weight. As
>>> you can
>>> imagine, I began a rapid descent, down the side of the
>>> building. In
>>> the vicinity of the third floor, I met the barrel coming
>>> up. This
>>> accounts for the two fractured ankles, broken tooth and
>>> several
>>>
>>> lacerations of my legs and lower body. Here my luck began
>>> to change
>>> slightly. The encounter with the barrel seemed to slow me
>>> enough to
>>> lessen my injuries when I fell into the pile of bricks and
>>> fortunately
>>> only three vertebrae were cracked. I am sorry to report,
>>> however, as I
>>>
>>> lay there on the pile of bricks, in pain, unable to move, I
>>> again lost
>>> my composure and presence of mind and let go of the rope
>>> and I lay
>>> there watching the empty barrel begin its journey back down
>>> onto me.
>>> This explains the two broken legs.
>>>
>>>
>>> I hope this answers your inquiry.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Jim Watts
>>> Paradigm Shift
>>> C&C 35 Mk III
>>>
>>> ----- Original Message -----
>>> From: "dwight veinot" <dwightveinot at hfx.eastlink.ca>
>>> To: <cnc-list at cnc-list.com>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Sent: Wednesday, December 02, 2009 3:18 PM
>>> Subject: Re: {Stus-List} mast
>>> climbing
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Can't be a true story...you made it up right...a
>>> good laugh despite the
>>> hardship suffered...he lived I hope
>>>
>>> Dwight Veinot
>>> 1974 C&C 35, Alianna
>>> Head of St. Margaret's Bay, NS
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: cnc-list-bounces at cnc-list.com
>>> [mailto:cnc-list-bounces at cnc-list.com]
>>>
>>> On Behalf Of Ronald B. Frerker
>>> Sent: December 2, 2009 6:27 PM
>>> To: cnc-list at cnc-list.com
>>> Subject: Re: {Stus-List} mast climbing
>>>
>>> Reminds me of the skipper who arrived before any crew and
>>> decided to hoist
>>>
>>> himself up the mast.  Loaded a large bucket of bricks and
>>> hoisted it up the
>>> mast with the halyard.  Then tied it off and also tied a
>>> foot loop in the
>>> halyard.  Placed his foot in the loop and released the
>>> line.  Weight was a
>>>
>>> little too heavy, so he went up pretty fast and got hit in
>>> the head with the
>>> bucket of bricks when they met halfway up.  Kept rocketing
>>> up 'til his
>>> fingers got jammed in the sheave.
>>> 'bout then, the bucket hit the deck and fell over,
>>> dumping out many bricks.
>>>
>>> Now he's heavier and comes down quickly.  Crashes to
>>> the deck, loses control
>>> of the line and the bucket comes down once more, hitting
>>> the spreader and
>>> dumping some bricks on him.
>>>
>>> Crew arrives to see the skipper unconscious on the deck
>>> with bricks all
>>>
>>> around.
>>> Ron
>>> Wild Cheri
>>>
>>>
>>>  {margin:0;}Appreciate
>>>> your stories.
>>>>
>>>> I tried to haul myself up our mast using a 4 to 1
>>>> tackle and mountain climbing gear. Later tried a 3 to
>>>>
>>>
>>>  1. After 30 minutes I got very
>>>> near the top but was exhausted, so abandoned the
>>>> plan. We since use a two halyard method.
>>>> One person winches you up and the 2nd person maintains
>>>>
>>> a
>>>
>>>> second halyard on you as a safety.
>>>>
>>>
>>>  Working separate winches, the two people can haul you
>>>> up together and share the load going up. I wear a
>>>> climbing harness that keeps me fairly comfortable for
>>>>
>>> up to
>>>
>>>> about an hour. It is difficult to find people who are
>>>>
>>>
>>>  skilled and can be trusted to stick around and stay
>>>>
>>> still
>>>
>>>> while you work aloft and be ready for the ride down.
>>>> Last time I was lucky to find two willing souls but I
>>>>
>>> had to
>>>
>>>> show one guy how to operate my clutches and how to
>>>>
>>> feed
>>>
>>>  a self tailing winch and how to keep tension on the
>>>>
>>> tail and
>>>
>>>> hold a hand on the wraps around the winch drum to
>>>> ease me down. The other guy was more experienced
>>>> and we proceeded very carefully and without a
>>>>
>>>
>>>  problem. Having two guys in the cockpit seems to work
>>>> well as they can help each other and then keep
>>>> each other company during the wait.
>>>>
>>>> Anyone climbing the mast,
>>>> Don't forget your camera. The pictures can be
>>>>
>>>
>>>  spectacular from up there.
>>>>
>>>> Chuck
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
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>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Ken Heaton & Anne Tobin
>>> 35 Ankerville Street
>>> Sydney, NS  B1P 1X8
>>>
>>> N46°07.682’  W060°11.241’
>>>
>>> (902) 562-5105
>>>
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>>>
>>> kenheaton at gmail.com
>>>
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>>
>>
>>
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>
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